Moon Over My Arky

People are on the move today, traveling from distant spots to experience the solar eclipse in real time. This convergence of world events happening alongside the eighth day of National Poetry Month 2024 would be (for some) an ideal opportunity to commemorate. Perhaps there are hundreds (thousands?) of poets waxing eloquent about the waxing (and waning) of the moon. Not me.

As a helpful tool for people unable to travel directly into the darkened path, NASA has provided a virtual map. In our local area, the main thoroughfares have posted warnings prohibiting parking on the shoulders during the eclipse, so it would seem there’s an expectation of multiple misdemeanor law-breakers early this afternoon. (I wonder if troopers will be so distracted by the eclipse they’ll forget to hand out tickets?) Continue reading “Moon Over My Arky”

Endergism

With the various apocalyptic pronouncements I’ve heard related to the upcoming “total solar eclipse” on Monday, April 8th, I decided there were definitely several poems I needed to post for National Poetry Month before the world is expected to be plunged into darkness for the foreseeable future! If April must have both its eclipse and National Poetry Month, then let’s go out with a bang, right?!

Of course, this possible world-ending event means I must take time to address the recent tempest-in-a-teapot kerfuffle  which occurred a week ago. It began with a Presidential proclamation which happened to intersect with the Christian observance of Resurrection Sunday/Easter, commemorating the resurrection from the dead of Jesus Christ, our God come in the flesh. Continue reading “Endergism”

Hail the Court Jester!

Today is April first. It’s also April Fools’ Day. Additionally, it happens to be the first day of National Poetry Month. Maybe if I looked a bit further, I’d find several other items of notable consideration, but I’m going to stop there.

My first participation in National Poetry Month was in 2014, so ten years ago. It was mildly amusing for me to offer posts with original poems in this space. I also participated in 2015, but after that, I stopped. I didn’t cease writing poetry. I just didn’t find it necessary to use the month of April as an incentive. However, in the last year, I’ve conducted some serious study of poetry and thought this would be an appropriate occasion to share my thoughts.

Continue reading “Hail the Court Jester!”

March On Women

In between my Beloved’s birthday (Friday, March 1) and Easter (Sunday, March 31), the March calendar for me has been filled with diversions! According to my desk calendar, we’ve observed Super Tuesday (3/5), the beginning of Daylight Saving Time (3/10), St. Patrick’s Day (3/17), and the First Day of Spring (3/19). Still ahead, this being Holy Week), we celebrate Palm Sunday (today), Good Friday (3/29) and the apex of Holy Week (Resurrection Day) on Easter Sunday. Phew! A busy month!

Image by congerdesign from Pixabay

Imagine my chagrin, then, when I realized the month of March had also been designated (by Congress) as Women’s History Month (WHM) in addition to the United Nations choosing March 8 as International Women’s Day (IWD) … though neither of these designations was deemed significant enough to appear in the notations on my desk calendar! Is it even possible I could be any more verklempt?!

Continue reading “March On Women”

Warren Who?

“Warren Piece.” I distinctly recall my mother uttering those two words as she ushered me out the door with my brothers on our summer afternoon trek to the library. Our visits to the public library were a regular occurrence in those days, and on occasion, we walked the mile+ distance sans adult supervision.

We had specific, unalterable instructions:  stay together, follow the usual route, be home before dinner, and never, ever, ever talk to strangers! We had a tight camaraderie, the three of us. Brother Eric (two years older than me) and brother Kevin (younger than me by eighteen months) might run ahead or dawdle behind from time to time, but being voracious readers, our expectation of new adventures hidden in books on the library’s seemingly endless bookshelves kept the three of us on course to our destination. Continue reading “Warren Who?”

So Long, Farewell 2021

At the beginning of 2021, I posted a light verse poem titled Hello, 2021! It was an intentional way to dismiss from my recall the memories of 2020. I asked some specific questions in that post, but concluded “2021 may not be so different than 2020.” And here I am (on the final day of 2021) thinking I was something of a prophet.

No, I won’t indulge in complaints (though I have many) nor discuss the divergent opinions on the deep, dark hole down which we’ve traveled. I imagine everyone is as exhausted as I am about all things Covid-19 and its various rabbit trails. As a topic of conversation and news-reporting, I’ve begun to shut it out (figuratively plugging my ears and whispering la-la-la-la-la!). Continue reading “So Long, Farewell 2021”

The 15-Day Year

Remember 2020? It was March 11, 2020 when all the purported experts instructed people (all over the globe) that we needed “15 days to slow the spread. That 15 days turned into a month … and then six weeks … and here we are (a year later) still laboring through various “baby steps”  in hopes of recovering some semblance of normalcy.

globe with mask
Image by Frauke Riether from Pixabay

Does it seem like it’s been a year? From my vantage point, it seems as if a decade or more has gone by! When children look back on this time, I can just hear the question to grandma or grandpa:  Granny & Gramps, what was the world like when people didn’t have to wear masks or social distance? Were you really allowed to go outside your house with faces uncovered?!! Continue reading “The 15-Day Year”

Happy Birthday, My Beloved!

Today, March 1st, is a special day we’re celebrating at our house. It is my dear Beloved’s birthday. He is my best friend, a mentor, and my respected spiritual leader. It’s almost impossible for me to recall a time when he wasn’t part of my life. Even before I knew him, I knew the kind of man I hoped (and prayed) my husband would be … and when I met him, I knew he was the one I’d been waiting for.

Beloved Patriot

In the picture above, I positioned his face over the image. Among his other fine qualities, I’m glad to acknowledge he is a patriot. The notion of patriotism has lost some of its sheen, unfortunately. But I’m pretty certain if he’d been alive in 1776, his name would have been included with all the other signers on the Declaration of Independence (maybe not entirely legible though) and he’d have been standing next to George Washington on the battlefields, fighting during our War for Independence. Continue reading “Happy Birthday, My Beloved!”

A Trip To Mars

There’s a curious film I recently discovered on the Internet Archive. It’s a silent Danish film from 1918 entitled A Trip to Mars. (The original title was Himmelskibet.) Ten years ahead of Buck Rogers and Flash Gordon, A Trip to Mars captured the imagination of early 20th-century earthbound film-makers and viewers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Trip_to_Mars

Given the founding of the private corporation SpaceX in 2002, an organization whose stated mission is “to enable the colonization of Mars,” space travel to Mars has taken on early 21st-century currency. In May 2020, SpaceX was the first private company (i.e. non-governmental) to send humans to the International Space Station. Continue reading “A Trip To Mars”

The Strength of Our Nation

The month of February has been designated annually (since 1976) as Black History Month in the United States. In his proclamation address announcing the designation, President Ronald Reagan noted: “understanding the history of Black Americans is a key to understanding the strength of our nation.” Indeed. In 2019, the Census Bureau estimated the Black population to be about 48 million individuals, approximately 15% of the entire US population. This year’s theme focuses on the Black family. It’s fitting to honor Black Americans whose presence has enriched our country.

From childhood, I recall learning about the friendship between Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln. Douglass was an extraordinary man whose accomplishments take on even greater significance given the challenges with which life presented him. Continue reading “The Strength of Our Nation”